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Evaluation of Fungicides for Control of Bean Rust, 2001, KES

N. B. Shamiyeh, A. B. Smith, and C. A. Mullins

 

Interpretative Summary

Rust developed late in the season with a sporadic distribution. All fungicide treated plots had significantly less rust symptoms than the untreated check plots.

Introduction

Successful commercial snap bean production requies establishment of adequate stands of healthy plants. Rust can be a devastating disease of snap beans in Tennessee and several other locations in the United States. Several strains of rust have been identified and variety susceptibility varies considerably. Although rust resistant varieties are available, they have not become widely grown commercially. Over several years of testing various cultivars in Tennessee, rust affected ‘Mountaineer Half Runner’ and ‘Pinto 111' beans in most years while numerous varieties of bush beans in the same trials were not affected by rust. A study was conducted in 2001 at The University of Tennessee Plateau Experiment Station at Crossville to evaluate the effect of selected fungicide treatments for control of snap bean rust.

Materials and Methods

Six fungicide treatments including a Bio-fungicide (Seranade) were evaluated for control of bean rust at The University of Tennessee Plateau Experiment Station, Crossville, TN. Fertilizer (15-15-15) was broadcast on 27 Apr at 300 lb/A. ‘Hialeah’ snap bean was planted in a randomized complete block design with four replications on 15 May. Plot size was three rows, 15 ft long. Rows were spaced 38 in apart, and seeds were spaced 2 in apart. Metolachlor (Dual) at 2 lb (ai)/A was applied for pre-emergence week control after the 15 May planting date. Fungicides were applied at the first appearance of rust on 22, 29 June, 6, 13, and 20 July. Plants were rated for rust using a scale of 0 (no rust) to 19 (severe rust with complete defoliation) on 29 June, 6, 13, and 20 July. All data were analyzed by ANOVA. Beans were harvested on 27 July and yield expressed in Ton/acre.

Results and Discussion

All treated plots had significantly less rust than the untreated check plots. Rust developed late in the season and was distributed sporadically. Degrees of control among the treatments varied with Seranade and Nove treated plots had significantly more disease severity than the resst of the treatments. Plots treated with BASE-500 and BAS-510 had no disease symptoms and had the highest yields.

Table 1. Leaf rush ratings of ‘Mountaineer White Half Runner’ snap beans receiving fungicide treatments at The University of Tennessee Plateau Experiment Station, Crossville, 2001.


Yield

Disease Rating (0-10)

Treatment

Formulation

Rate lb ai/a

6/29/01

7/6/01

7/13/01

7/20/01

Ton/A

Nova

40WP

0.125

0.00

0.56

1.50

2.00

5.12

BAS-5510

70WG

0.350

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

73.21

BAS-500

70WG

0.500

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

6.69

Seranade

100FL

2.00%

0.00

1.63

2.06

2.31

4.93

Seranade

100FL

2.00%

0.00

 

 

 

 

Alternate with BAS-500

70WG

0.350

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.56

5.53

Bravo Ultrex

82.5WP

2.220

0.00

0.63

1.00

0.75

5.25

UTC

-----

-----

1.13

3.03

5.56

7.38

3.78

LSD (0.05)

 

 

0.14

0.13

0.38

0.32

0.90

Copyright © 1999 by The University of Tennessee. All rights reserved.

This research represents one season's data and does not constitute recommendations.  After sufficient data is collected over the appropriate number of seasons, final recommendations will be made through research and extension publications.

 

 

 

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